Thursday, November 05, 2009

Tablet weaving: practice run part II


Thanks for all your comments on my SOS post! This is my second attempt, in pink and white silk (1200 dernier) from Devere Yarns. This silk gives a very smooth, soft and shiny braid :-). The braid is about 1 cm in width. In the upper row, you can clearly see the point where I reversed the directions of the tablets. It's not so obvious as in my first attempt, but I'm not sure whether I like it: it really disrupts the smooth surface... I also found it difficult to maintain the tension of the weft. I guess that in my next attempt, I have to pull the weft a little tighter, because now it really shows at the edges.

(A reenactors dilemma: reversing the tablets is done in the original work, but the braid looks much better without it. To go for "authentic" or to go for "beautiful"? I'm inclined to go for beautiful...)

I want to use this type of braid to make some 14th century garters. (I've put my embroidery projects on hold and I'm currently focusing on a set of ca. 1370 clothes. )

You can find a picture of the original in
Crowfoot, E., Pritchard, F., & Staniland, K., Textiles and Clothing c. 1150-c. 1450. Medieval Finds from Excavations in London, 4. London: The Boydell Press, p 133 braid C.
A pattern of this braid can be found here.

11 comments :

Leonor said...

I'm pretty sure there are other examples of period tablet weaving without reverses--so if you're going for something that fits into the general trend of period tablet weaving rather than a replica of a specific piece, I think you could go either way.

Gina-B said...

Looks good!
I agree with Leonor - there are plenty of smaller lengths with no reversal, so, especially as you're making garters, you can continue without I reckon.

I don't like them either, though sometimes they do make weaving easier!

Machteld said...

I'm glad you both feel the same way: the garters will look much better without the reversal :-)

Ann Marie said...

I do tablet weaving for reanctment as well, and I don't put in reversals either, unless the pattern calls for it. When they are built into a pattern, the reversals aren't as obvious, and you can plan where the weft shows as a part of the overall design.

Castillo del Cierzo said...

Good work!
I follow your blog for time, now I have one own.

Greetings from Barcelona

said...

Govern your thoughts when alone, and your tongue when in company...................................................

Iconos said...

Very interesting site! Congratulations. Greetings from Spain.

Tablet Weaving Blog said...

Very good site! Looks very nice and clearly explained.The photos are beautiful and very illustrative. We will follow you from Spain. Greetings.

Maria said...

excuse me, tell me please the name of this work? Thank you, Maria
www.mariabissacco.it

Erik said...

Stunning. I'm currently learning this thechnique on my school. We've also been learning a weaving thechnique when you use a "braid gate" to weave. Do you know what it's called in English?

Kirsi Frimanson said...

Hi, a tip for you, so you dont need to reverse weave:The trick is to thread bricks in both ends of the warp and weave alternate from both ends using reversed looping. That way your loops un-tangle : )

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